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What is survival gardening? Survival gardening is making your garden invisible to those in your area by means of spreading the plants out over large areas and hiding them in spots that most are not likely to find. If you find yourself in a shtf situation, then you will not want your neighbors to know you have a huge garden and that you are eating good when they are starving. That is calling unwanted attention to yourself. Your goal is to be stealthy about all things and never let those around know you are fat and happy. Jealousy insights violence, so it is best to never let them know what you are up to. Never clump a bunch of the same crop all in one area. You have to use deceptive techniques such as hiding a small batch of plants behind vegetative barriers.

Plant species that are conducive to each other such as planting ivy type plants next to corn so that they can use the stalks to grow towards the sun. Underneath the corn you can plant sprawling plants such as squash which can actually help keep critters away from the corn. But you need make sure these clumps of plants are not noticeable and hidden in corners that get plenty of sun and nutrients. You can even use man made materials to funnel more rain water to individual areas.

Another extremely important factor is to consider animals and critter control. One way is to use chicken wire to wrap a fence around the circumference of the mini garden. Another more camo-ed version is to make a natural barrier with trees or debris. No matter how cautious you are about blocking these things off from the animals, it is inevitable some will get in. So, I suggest letting the garden act as bait for certain animals and then trap the heck out of the area. This will not only make this a vegetable source but it will also begin producing meat for you! In a shtf situation, you will not have the option to be picky about your gathering methods. So you have to optimize each food plot accordingly. And don’t forget to pick heirloom seeds only and make sure you always dry out plenty for the next year! Make your own fertilizer by mixing moist decayed leaf debris and scat to increase your yield! These methods should keep you fat and happy in bad days and come take a look at some of the courses we offer in this area if your interested in learning more!

Summary: Plant in a stealthy manner, use man made or primitive materials to funnel water and nutrients to plants, fence off from animals, plant like types and utilize ground area to the maximum, trap the area for large and small game, use heirloom seeds and dry out your seeds for next year, make your own fertilizer!

Hey Everyone,

This is gonna be another round of ‘As the World Turns’, starring Robert in the woods. Well we went out this last weekend from Friday afternoon until Sunday afternoon. Got to do a lot of things, so I’ll just start from the beginning. It was a hot night this last Friday and the bugs/humidity were out in full force. We made a fire and got our beds ready. After prepping camp we decided to go forage a bit before dark. The wild edibles were quite scarce and there weren’t many real quick tasty bites to be had. Found some wild plums that I harvested to stuff our roast chicken with for later that night. Also found some Sumac seeds and collected a pocket full so that I could make some of my famous sumac lemonade later. Sumac lemonade is really tasty even without sugar!

The sun fell over the ridge and we stopped foraging to head back to camp! We all pitched in to get the fire cranking and I threw the chicken in the dutch oven to roast up for us. Cooked it for around two hours with fire from below and coals on the lid. We ate dinner and turned in for the night.

The next morning we awoke to start working on the camp but decided that it was miserably hot and that we should go fishing instead. I made some mouthwash from oak bark and sassafras to clean my mouth out and we went to the pond. My wisdom teeth began acting up so the mouth-wash was a great medicinal remedy to keep my mouth clean and to help any soreness from infection.

When we got down to the pond I hooked up a little fishing rig that has always worked well for me in the past. I tied a trot line to the end of a long stick and used a small stick as a bobber. From that stick I tied the bait on to the bobber and used the stick as a way to throw my bait out there. I had killed a copperhead last night and I chopped it up in small pieces and used it as bait. Snake is personally my favorite bait to use because of its ability to stay on the hook for a very long time and the fact that the fish love eating them. Last year I caught ten fish on one tiny baby water moccasin that was not longer than my pointer finger! They really do work great! I put a few fish sets out and then we went to my favorite fishing spot for me to personally watch. As soon as I threw it in we had a hit within less than a minute and a fish on shore. After that we hooked a medium sized turtle that we let go. All in all, it wasn’t a killin but we had caught enough to get some much needed protein. Also made a minnow trap that was highly effective. I caught 5 minnows within the first minute and had a sushi meal in minutes from nothing but a water bottle! The school will be posting a video later on how to make this little trap. I also whittled a primitive gorge hook and showed how to make line out of willow to show the guys how you could catch fish if you had no equipment at all.

The next day a friend and I went up to the cliffs that overlook the whole valley up behind camp. You could literally see for 20 miles up there. With a set of binoculars it felt like there wasn’t anything that we couldn’t see. I whittled a trap while we contemplated the cosmos and enjoyed the cool northerly breeze. The two of us had taken the hard route up the cliff face and needed a little of God’s air conditioning to cool us off. After an hour or so we called it a day and headed back. As we walked we started playing a tracking game that I like to play. One person turns away while the other person walks about 50 yards to a spot of their choosing. When the person tells you they are done, you turn around and track each one of their tracks until you walk up to them. It is a good little drill for training to be able to see tracks quickly in debris and other substrates. You should always be trying to read the pressure releases because they will tell you exactly where the next track should be. After a short game of it we reached camp and I began crafting some trap triggers. Such as the modified figure 4 deadfall and the twitch up snare trigger. We walked down to an area I knew to be filled with game and did some tracking right before dark. We went to a spot I knew was full of raccoon dens. We trained on setting up the snare in high probability locations. After setting the snare we removed them and went back to the road.

I got a feeling that we should go down to the open field by the pond we fished in earlier to check for wildlife. I suspected that we might run into some deer. We rolled up into the field and sure enough their was a small herd of deer just north of us a couple hundred yards away. Then I looked to the east and a doe and fawn had popped out to forage on the field. Adam and I watched them for awhile and then headed back to camp before it got completely dark.

When we got back to camp I stoked the fire to make a smudge to fumigate my tick infested clothing. We had been through some dense bush and I had picked up a slug of seed ticks on my pants. So I took off my pants and hung them over a tripod in order to fumigate the ticks. After that it was time to crash!

We spent the rest of the next morning tracking and looking at different flora around the property. After that we decided it was time to roll it up for the weekend, so we cleaned up camp and headed back for the weekend. This is just a short rundown of our first Sigma III survival weekend to let you know a little bit about what kind of things we are going to be doing. As we progress the weekends will get more intense and will be more training oriented. This was just a little meet and greet weekend with members I have been chatting with for sometime. I just want to take a moment and say that I appreciate everyone coming out and that I hope you had as enjoyable time as I did. Thanks and look forward to seeing everyone in our upcoming classes.

Josh said on 9/17/10 – 01:21AM

Comment: I had an awesome time! I wish I could have stayed longer, but duty calls. Actually ended up getting a call from the fire department as soon as I got back in town…a little girl went missing in Barling so we did a big ground search. Bummer evening. I’m really looking forward to more weekends at the camp!

About a month ago I decided to go do some storm work in OKC, since the Fort Smith area seems to be dead for construction right now. I decided to camp out instead of getting a hotel room and save some money. So for the last 3-4 weeks I have been camping out by the lake and going to work in the morning. But I have an interesting survival story to tell about some of the things that went down while we were camping. The location isn’t exactly remote in fact it was within city limits on a little spot called lake arcadia. We found a somewhat secluded spot to set up camp and basically just slept out on the ground with nothing but a small pad and sleeping bag. No shelter, no tent! It was great except when there was a lot of condensation on the ground from overnight dew. But I thought it would be a great idea to get some survival training in while I’m out of town. So, I went traveling around the lake looking for food and found some delightfully ripe mulberries. They are so tasty! Their were many wild edibles, to many to mention, but needless to say someone could feed themselves quite easily with just a little gathering.

But what I really wanted to talk about in this story is the crazy fish! Their are more carp on this lake than any other I have ever seen in my life. At dusk and dawn the fish are just everywhere, not to mention all the snakes that like to swim by 4 feet from my bed to say hey at night time. But the fish were nuts! The water was up into the woodline around the lake so you could wade up in the shallows and see them moving everywhere. So needless to say I grabbed my survival walking stick which converts into a spear, fish gig, or blowgun. I screwed on the fish gig around 3 in the mornin and went out in the full moon and started stalking the fish. It was quite amazing to see them in the moonlight and you could stalk up to within a few feet without them seeing you. Before the little hunt was over I had speared two carp around 4-6 pounds and called it quits after that. Don’t like to kill more than neccessary. But I could have easily killed 20-30 fish if I wanted. It was like spearing fish in a barrel. For those of you who have never spear fished before, it is very difficult and this was a rare situation where it was relatively easy. It takes extreme patience and stealth to spear fish in less than the most optimum of conditions, so this was quite a treat to say the least. Seems I learn something new every time I go out! I love survivalism, it truly is the ultimate sense of freedom to know that no matter what happens that you will be able to provide for yourself and others.

I think survivalism is very much like martial arts in a lot of ways. For those of you who have trained in any kind of fight sport, then you know that sense of confidence that training installs in your mind. Survivalism gives you that exact same confidence, but on a whole other level. It not only gives you a sense of confidence, but also teaches you an entirely new way of living that will bring about a higher state of health for the body and the mind!

Well, I figured I would sit down and write my first blog on what I did today? Well, I went down to work on the camp and got an awesome hammock installed between two hickory trees today. I know, I know; its not exactly primitive but it was made in China, so I bet you a lil sweat factory worker in some lil primitive village made it, so I thought what the heck. What would be nicer then a big comfy hammock for the camp? Yall are gonna really think I’m not doing it primitive after I get my camp kitchen and bar fully stocked. Yes Yes, I can do everything the hard way but I have come to the philosophy that if you have done the basic survival techniques numerous times that you can let modern technology jump in and help you focus on other things for mastery. Because doing things the old way all the time can become very time consuming.

On the way to the camp (2/3 of a mile from camp) I have to go up the hill and there is a gate where who knows how many snakes live, I’m always real careful around this gate because you never know when one is going to be out of his hole. Well sure enough, I start looking around and there was a 3′ water moccassin sitting there sunning himself, so I decided to go introduce myself to him and see if he was friendly. I think he was a little cold from the last few days because he didn’t move too much, but I introduced myself by grabbing a stick and poking him a little to see if I could get an opportunity to pick him up. Now, I’m not a snake tamer or anything, I don’t play with em like the croc hunter, but every once in awhile I’ll pick one up. But this one decided not to be friendly and go back down his hole. So I went on about my day.

After that I went to camp got the hammock hung up and decided to clean up camp a bit and call it a day (only short afternoon trip to camp) so I could do some exploring for some wild edibles and sure enough I found some tasty treats! Ran onto some Sumac trees (the non poisonous versions of course), and they are pretty tasty if you haven’t had them! You take the ends off the new growth branches, peel the outside coating off, and eat the center; its very much like asparagus with a fruity flavor.

If you have never had sumac lemonade then buddy you are missing out! You take seeds in the summer after they turn dark red and make them like you would sun tea (or boil them) and they make this very wonderful tasting lemonade that the indians use to drink all the time. Add sugar and I think it tastes better than store bought lemonade!

Ran into some other tasty wild edibles but nothin to write home about. After got done feeding my face with the tasty nibbles I headed back to the truck and headed home. On the way back to the house not far from camp; I saw 4 separate groups of deer in sporadic spots along the road. They were moving quite a bit before sundown today! Two weeks ago I had stalked some Turkeys through a field and as I was trying to get behind them, I low crawled up through some brush and saw one of these deer about 25 yards away in some dense cover. She turned around and headed another direction, but it was fun nonetheless sneaking that close to a couple of turkey and deer at the same time. Thats it for todays field log keep tuned in for entry logs, I am going to try and report back on things that happen to me in the field and the new stuff I learn.

Survival Chick said on 4/30/10 – 12:38PM

Comment: Any suggestions on a book for wild edibles?

Founder said on 5/1/10 – 06:58AM

Comment: Well, I use Peterson’s Field Guide for Wild Edibles. It is okay and gets the job done, but it is lacking a lot. I’m actually writing my own book on the subject right now! The book will contain pics of the plant in its different stages, it will be color pics, each plant will have two pages devoted to it, one for info and one just for pics. The basic info will tell you where to collect the plant, how to prepare it, its medicinal uses, etc. And it will be field worthy as well, small/compact, water resistant, lightweight and will contain the top two hundred tastiest wild edibles. I will be selling the book on the website probably by the end of the year and hope to get it published. The market is really lacking any useful field guides on the subject. I’m also going to make an Iphone app, because there isn’t a single app on the subject that I’ve found. Thanks for the comment!

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